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Exclusive Album Review: Dance in the Deluge by BEEFYWINK


I've been lucky enough to give this debut album from BEEFYWINK a spin before its release later this year!

Bristol-born, BEEFYWINK have been asserting their presence in the South West since 2016. Describing themselves as 'post-punk cuties', the trio have supported the likes of NOVA TWINS and Sœur throughout their reign and have graced venues such as Rough Trade in Bristol.



Bashful and riff-driven, The Ballad of a Political Barista is an appropriate welcome into this album. This song has a descending tone to it, both due to the downward bass-line played by AZ and commentary on the political game we are all so willing to play. Already, this track demonstrates BEEFYWINK’s electric performance and lyrical wit. In this initial track, we first hear a very well-executed marriage between the deep vocals of K-Rush and piercing voice belonging to Daisy Daze. Notably, I much enjoyed the added detail of what sounds like coffee cups clinking together; tying in with the narrative of the song as well as adding an unusual percussive element. My only quarrel with this song is its length – I feel the song was interesting enough that it didn’t need to be extended to nearly 6 minutes with more instrumental sections.

'Combine hot-chocolate, coffee and a tory and what do you get? A fucking mocha-ry!!!'



Feel Me?, released as a single earlier this month contains frustrated riffs from both bass and guitar that are satisfyingly dissonant with each other. I did find the chorus somewhat repetitive and complacent, however this song includes a fantastic breakdown that is reminiscent of Arctic Monkeys’ album Favourite Worst Nightmare. The change of tempo and erratic drum pattern is excellently executed and in my opinion, was really needed in this song.









Track number three, entitled Mr Lah Di Dah obtains a funky groove provided by bass paired with a fruitful narrative and cheeky guitar riffs. This one will definitely be a favourite for fans of Fontaines D. C. or even Blur. Potentially my favourite on the album for its stark attitude and compelling bass-line. Again, this track included an unnecessary climactic ending, I liked the drop out of all instruments apart from bass and vocals, it allowed that great bass-line some glory.


I enjoyed the Wolf Alice vocal style that Daisy portrays in Holocene Heroine, sort of apathetic yet still expressive as hell. This song does become a bit lost at the middle, it sounds a tad like a live performance when a guitarist breaks a string and the rest of the band have to improvise – a bit distracting. Alike Feel Me?, this band can certainly write a gripping bridge section, I really liked the delivery of the phrase “driving ninety down the motorway, you and I see things in a different way”, it really portrayed a strong image in my head and a sense of weariness with the delayed chorus guitar tone used. This time a very appropriate climactic end.


Daisy Daze captured at The Cotswold Inn, Cheltenham

Ulrike conveys an epic sound and sense of space; as the first verse starts, I am immediately reminded of Gorillaz album Humanz, due to the slick and addictive alliance of bass, drums and rap vocals by K-Rush. This song is certainly not afraid of its R&B roots, with a denser kick, syncopated bass-line and sampling. I do feel like this song was dragged on a bit too long than it needed to be, whenever I felt the climax of the song would be appropriate, it tended to fizzle out.

The fifth track of the album, Charlatan has more of a playful tone, commenting on the all too relatable political climate in which everyone claims to be an expert in the field. Admittedly, I wasn’t as immersed into this song compared to its predecessors, however I do commend the guitar composition in this song. The walking guitar melody during the first verse is tasteful and reminded me of almost a medieval mode, which of course relates the other song’s title rather nicely.

The final track called Bottom Feeder really has a live quality to it; carrying an immense amount of energy is commendable as it can be hard to capture this in the studio. This song is a bit like being on a rollercoaster; I’m embracing the thrill however the frequent climaxes and complex structure makes it hard to follow. I can’t help but feel though that at over 6 minutes, this song could be seen as a bit self-indulgent, though, I can appreciate it would be more effective in a live setting. The trio of vocals work best in this song, coming together in unison; a fulfilling finish to an album about the grievances of politics.




Overall, Dance in the Deluge is the lovechild of a chaotic political society expressed authentically with a grungy temper and hip-hop attitude. The composition of this album demonstrates BEEFYWINK’s ability to allow inspiration from other artists, whilst still being original and advocating their own sound; stimulating and dauntless. The narrative of the album and choice of track list is fluid yet still provides various flavours with songs such as Mr. Lah Di Dah and Ulrike. I admire the undoubtable energy BEEFYWINK have captured in these recordings, the use of dynamics to give significance to the subject of their songs is stellar. As mentioned a few times above, my only issues lay with lengthy track durations and unresolved climaxes, but this something that is not detrimental to the album. Due to its tasteful lyrics paired with rousing rhythms and riffs, I would recommend this album to both lovers of Rock and Hip-hop as it certainly provides an intricate blend of the two genres.

It was my pleasure to get a first listen of this debut album from BEEFYWINK, audacious and electrifying, it serves well as an introduction to their inspired sound and spirited personality.



Keep your eyes peeled for the release of Dance in the Deluge on all major platforms coming later this year!




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